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Hardware Repair by brands All about hardware problems sorted by brands inside subsections.

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Old 04-06-2006, 11:21   #31 (permalink)
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Cellphone repair guide in Visual Basic Form.... here.

Dear all,

Hope this small program will help you in your search for learning.

Here it is :

http://rapidshare.de/files/17325655/..._bojs.rar.html

Have fun!!!

br,
bojs
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Old 04-06-2006, 15:11   #32 (permalink)
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Asta la vista dearz.
gud to listen u all friendz. I would like to help those friendz who wantz to know about this field. If anyone would like to want help so plz contact me on my private address.
these my ad******* razzaqbaloc@yahoo.com & onelove980@hotmail.com
my cell # iz +923012227229 & +923212744965
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Old 04-28-2006, 14:07   #33 (permalink)
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help tips

Put all your Questions on here, and we will try to help you out?
This what We cover in our course.

Icti ADVANCED CELLULAR PHONE REPAIR COURSE


CONTENTS

1. Electronic Basics

2. Soldering Techniques

3. Ohm’s Law

4. Electrostatic Electricity

5. How a GSM Cellular Network Operates

6. Cell & Cell Sector Technology Explained

7. The Concept of Cellular technology and the GSM system

8. The GSM Concept

9. SIM Cards, identity numbers,IMSI, PIN, and PUK

10. How Cell Phones Work – the Cell Approach

11. From Cell to Cell

12. Cell Phones & CB Radios

13. Inside a Cell Phone -Components explained

14. Advanced Mobile Phone System – AMPS

15. Digital System

16. Cellular Access Technologies

17. Cell Phone Towers and Base Stations

TECHNICAL SECTION

18. Component Identification – Base Band, RF Section, Control

19. Cellular Phone Repairs – Types of Damages incurred

20. Cellular Phone Repairs – Notes on Batteries

21. Trouble Shooting Steps – Introduction

22. Most Common Components Used in a Cellular Phone and problems that occur.

23. Dissasembly of Cellular Phones

24. Assembly of a Cellular Phone

25. Most Common Problems that occur

26. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing a LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)

27. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing Speakers

28. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing Microphones

29. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing Ringers

30. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing Charging Block/Systems Connector

31. Cellular Phone Repairs – Replacing Antennas

32. Cellular Phone Repairs – Liquid & Moisture Damaged Phones

33. Cellular Phone Repairs – Refurbishing of Phones

34. Cellular Phone Repairs – Power on Procedure of a Cell Phone

35. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action– Cell Phone Batteries

36. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & required Action – Phone Has No Power – Switches Off

37. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – Phone Has No Power

38. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – Phone Not Charging

39. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – Phone Not Receiving Signal

40. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – SIM CARD related Problems

41. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) problems

42. Quick Trouble Shooting Guide & Required Action – Call Dropping

43. Setting Up your Workshop

44. Tools and Consumables.

45. Possible Examination Questions.

HANDS ON PRACTICAL

You will now get the opportunity to put into practice what you have learnt in the Theory section of the Course

1. Getting Familiar with tools of the trade –
Hot Air Station
Soldering Station
Toolkit
Multimeter
Handling Components.
2. Desoldering and soldering componenets from and onto PC Boards

3. Tracing Faults

4. Repairing Phones – Replacing Key Board Components.

5. BGA (Ball Grid Assembly) component replacement

6. Fitting of Faceplates, casings

7. EXAMINATION
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Old 04-28-2006, 16:14   #34 (permalink)
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Hi!I have problem with my Nokia 9500.I don't have signal.
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Old 05-02-2006, 15:27   #35 (permalink)
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teaching mobile lessions

I have some experience in preparing & teaching mobile lessions. May be I can be of some help to you , atulvp or anyone else here ?
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Old 05-03-2006, 08:21   #36 (permalink)
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Basic Electronics

ELECTRONIC BASICS

Persons new to electronics can have difficulties with the component values and
descriptions. Here are some guidelines for resolving these problems.
a) Basics
b) Resistors
c) Capacitors
d) Diodes
e)Transistors
f) IC's


Basics
The most often used terms in electronics are voltage and current
To give you a metaphor for this you can think of a river.
The voltage is the length of the river and the current can be seen the current of the river.
This current is due the difference in height between the start and end of the river.
One law you have to remember is law of Ohm. (See OHM’S LAW). It is a simple law.

Voltage = Current * Resistance
or U = I * R

Where voltage is in voltage [V], current in Ampere [A] and the resistance in
Ohm.
To make it easier for you to make conversions I will provide you [literally] a
rule of thumb.

Voltage [V]
-------------------------------
Current [I] * Resistance [Ohm]

Now just place your thumb over the unknown value and you will see what you have
to do to find the value. For example. If you want the know the resistance then
you have to divide the voltage by the current.

Numbers can become quiet large in electronics. To prevent writing many zero's
they use often different names. The following names are used.

Value, milli-, micro-, nano- and pico-
Example: Farad [capacitor] Farad, milli Farad [mF], micro Farad [uF], nano Farad
[nF], pico Farad [pF]
Every step is 1000 smaller like 1 Kg is 1000 Grams.

Resistors

Symbol
---/\/\/\/\----
or
------
---| |-----
------

A resistor can be seen as a dam in a river. Water will have more difficulties to
pass this dam. In a resistor this will result in the generation of heat.

Resistors come in standard values to choose from. The value of a resistor can be
found with the help of a colour table. The resistor has a set of coloured rings
that will tell you its value.

First ring : First number
Second ring : Second number
Third ring : Number of zeros to add
Fourth ring : Tolerance [quality of the resistor. Mostly 5%]

1 Brown Examples:
2 Red 4700 Ohm 1 000 000 Ohm
3 Orange Yellow Purple Red Brown Black Green
4 Yellow
5 Green
6 Blue
7 Purple Brown Black Brown Red Red Red
8 Grey 100 Ohm 2200 Ohm
9 'White'
0 Black

Values are often written as 10K, 1M or 4K7. This means in this case 10.000,
1.000.000 and 4700 Ohm. The 'K' just stands for Kilo and tells you that there is
a factor 1000 there. The 'M' stands for mega and adds another factor 1000

Capacitors
\
Symbol
||
---||---
||
A capacitor can have more functions but one of them is to store some energy in
them. They act like a bucket. You can fill them with energy and drop the
contents back when you need it.

Values are often written as 10N or 2N2. This means in this case 10.000 and 2200
nano Farad. The 'N' just stands for nano. Small capacitors can have only numbers
on them like 104. The first two digits is a number and the third digit tells you
how many zeros you must add. In this case its four. The correct value of this
component is 100 000 pF. [note: 100 nF or 0.1uF is also correct]

Diode
Symbol
|\ |
___| \|___
| /|
|/ |


Diodes are the passive one-way locks in the river. Water can flow through them
only in one direction. And only when there is enough difference in height
[voltage].

Knowing this you may notice that a diode needs to have a direction to function.
To show this there is a small mark at the casing. Normally this is a ring. For
LED this isn't the case. You have to look inside and see the small plates. The
one with the largest plate is the side where the 'ring' would be.
Transistor

Symbol

| /c c = collector
___|/ b = basis
b |\ e = emitter
| \e


These are the active locks in the river. They have a lock gate that can control
the flow through them. They can also act like a switch. With a little current
they can be opened and let a strong current pass. In the symbol there is also a
arrow that will tell you the direction of flow. There are two basic transistor
types namely; PNP and NPN. They are named to differentiate between different internal designs. A PNP has a symbol with the arrow pointing inwards and a NPN
transistor has a arrow pointing outwards.

IC (Intergrated Circuit)
Symbol
An IC doesn't have a universal symbol.
It all depends on its use. A few
examples are shown here.

|\ +---+
___| \___ -| & |
| / -| |-
|/ +---+

A little box that contains many small components as above. A complete circuit
can be inside the black plastic casing.

They have often 8, 14 or 16 pins.

They are used for many purposes. The casing has a small notch on top of it or carved
out of it.
If you look at this mark and holding the mark on top then the first
lead on the right side will be pin number one.

Counting the pins downwards and continue at the first pin at the bottom at the other side.
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Old 05-03-2006, 14:19   #37 (permalink)
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Very Nice Compilations !
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Old 05-04-2006, 04:42   #38 (permalink)
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http://rapidshare.de/files/17325655/..._bojs.rar.html


this link its onlyy pay acu.....


enybody please i needd for free download ?????????????
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Old 05-06-2006, 08:33   #39 (permalink)
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Amigo

Hi Amigo

What do you thik of step 1? What is you input on it?
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Old 05-07-2006, 11:26   #40 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucascape
Hi Amigo

What do you thik of step 1? What is you input on it?
I already appreciated your work brother ! Do you want me to add anything to what you already did so nicely ?
I can post my version of the same topics but yours is too good to be supplemented !
Regards
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Old 05-07-2006, 15:53   #41 (permalink)
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To understand mobile you must have basic Radio and some TV Knowledge.
Think Mobile as a Digital Radio tuned to one station.In mobile incoming signal is amplified within ant. switch filtered by saw filters.which pass only narrow band off signal any unwanted signal is filtered out.then signal goes to RF ic were it is mixed with another signal which is generated locally in SHVCO and there difference which is lower than actuall signal is again filtered out in IF section and finally demodulated in RF ic.Incoming signal level is always not same it flactuate so AGC signal is generated (example in 3315 Cobba generates AGC signal).And SHVCO also tends to drift from its central frequency it is control by AFC signal (again generated by cobba) and keep it stable.In Radio all signals are analogue.In Mobile all signals are Digital.Mobile is a complex Radio.All functions are controlled by Software runned by CPU.
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Old 05-10-2006, 14:09   #42 (permalink)
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Chapter 2 Soldering Techniques

How important is soldering?


Among the foremost of reasons an electronic project frequently fails to work
properly is due to "poor" soldering practices. This is usually caused by "dry
joints" when soldering. Here we discuss the correct procedures for soldering
electronic projects.
Dry joints when soldering

At first glance many solder joints appear to be quite "O.K." but on closer
examination many are in fact defective. The insidious problem with dry joints in
soldering is that the circuit frequently performs alright for a period of time,
even years before failure.

This problem even occurs with manufactured equipment. Ask any TV / Video repair/Cell Phone technician who has torn a lot of hair out over an elusive fault ultimately traced back to a dry joint.
Good soldering practices for your electronic project

The cause of dry joints in soldering is mostly the improper application of heat.
Both the component leg and the PCB need to be both heated simultaneously to the
correct temperature to allow the solder to flow freely between BOTH surfaces.
Obviously this requires practice and most newcomers inevitably get it wrong.
Improper heating while soldering and its consequences can be seen below.



Figure 1 - correct soldering procedures to avoid dry joints

Here in figure 1 entitled "correct soldering procedures to avoid dry joints" we
have three examples of soldering depicted.

The first example indicates the component lead was heated while the PCB wasn't heated.As a consequence the solder only flowed onto the component lead.




In the second example of soldering in figure 1 we find the PCB was correctly
heated while little or inadequate heat was applied to the component lead. This
is the most treachorous example because although I have made it very obvious in
the diagram, in practice it is not always particularly obvious.

Often this type of dry joint "just" allows the solder to "touch" the component lead while not actually being "soldered" to the lead. Of course it might work for a period of time depending upon environmental conditions of heat and cold.



In the final example of "correct soldering procedures to avoid dry joints" We
have depicted the solder bridging both the PCB and the component lead.

In this case the PCB and the component lead were both heated "simultaneously" AND the solder was applied to either the component lead or the PCB to "flow" freely from one to the other to provide a good "electrical" joint. Such a joint is always "bright and shiny", dull looking joints are often suspect.

You never apply the solder to the soldering iron "tip". Solder is always applied
to the "job", never the soldering iron. Allow the solder to "set" and cool
before proceeding to the next joint.




Other cases of soldering

We have discussed soldering components to a PCB yet this is not the only case of
soldering. Often we need to connect wires to switches and other components. A
common misconception is that soldering is designed to provide a good mechanical
joint. - It isn't!

Any connection should have it's own mechanical strength perhaps by twisting
wires together or twisting the wire around a binding post or through a hole
provided for the purpose.

The solder is only intended for a good "electrical" connection. Never provide a connection which can't stand mechanically on it's own merits.










What's soldering flux?



Modern quality electronics solders contain a "flux" resin within the solder.
This flux is designed to flow over the job and prevent contact with the
atmosphere.

Metals, particularly copper when heated tend to "oxidise" and prevent the alloying or good electrical bond between the copper and the solder.

Good solder containing the resin will have resin flowing over the leads and
prevent this oxidisation process and as the solder flows the resin is displaced
allowing the solder to form an "atomic" bonding with the items being soldered
together. A good resin helps to keep the surfaces clean.




Rules for good soldering

Of course some of these rules might seem very obvious but are worth repeating.

 Use a reasonable quality iron of the correct wattage for the job.

 Only use "electronic" resin cored solder of fine gauge.

 Make sure all surfaces to be soldered are "bright, shiny" and thoroughly
clean.

 If a mechanical joint, make sure it can "stand alone" before soldering.

 Make sure the solder tip is clean, shiny and properly "wetted".

 Remember the soldering iron tip is only to heat up the surfaces to be
soldered.

 Apply the resin cored solder to the heated "job", not to the soldering iron
tip.

 Remember to visually inspect ALL of your soldered joints, preferably with
magnifying glasses.

 Consider using your multimeter to provide an "electrical continuity" check
between various parts of the circuit.
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Old 05-12-2006, 09:36   #43 (permalink)
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lucascape, you are great, we ve been waiting for something like this.keep on posting goodies like this.
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Old 05-12-2006, 09:56   #44 (permalink)
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can u send me a repair manual to my email morgan_james92
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Old 05-12-2006, 13:05   #45 (permalink)
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a small dos. progy abt. basic ele.

new motorola hardware solut1on

wbr
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